30th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Teenage Pics with 443 notes


If you’re a teen you must follow this blog.

If you’re a teen you must follow this blog.

25th August 2014

Photo reblogged from SoSanguineRN with 253 notes

medresearch:

Alzheimer’s Clue


















"A new study may help scientists unlock a medical mystery.  Researchers have found that rheumatoid arthritis patients seem to have protection from developing Alzheimer’s disease.  The scientific link between the two may help researchers develop a new treatment for Alzheimer’s.
Looking at pictures is just one way Bob and Donna Otten cope, after Bob was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease four years ago. While looking through old photos, Donna explained “It’ll help him recall what we saw, because he won’t remember the trip all that well.”
A new study from the University of Colorado may change that. “A protein that is released during rheumatoid arthritis into the blood seems to get into the brain and prevent Alzheimer’s disease from getting hold.” Dr. Huntington Potter, professor of Neurology at the University of Colorado told Ivanhoe.”
Read more

medresearch:

Alzheimer’s Clue

"A new study may help scientists unlock a medical mystery.  Researchers have found that rheumatoid arthritis patients seem to have protection from developing Alzheimer’s disease.  The scientific link between the two may help researchers develop a new treatment for Alzheimer’s.

Looking at pictures is just one way Bob and Donna Otten cope, after Bob was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease four years ago. While looking through old photos, Donna explained “It’ll help him recall what we saw, because he won’t remember the trip all that well.”

A new study from the University of Colorado may change that. “A protein that is released during rheumatoid arthritis into the blood seems to get into the brain and prevent Alzheimer’s disease from getting hold.” Dr. Huntington Potter, professor of Neurology at the University of Colorado told Ivanhoe.”

Read more

Source: medresearch

25th August 2014

Post reblogged from スワン with 7,058 notes

whose-titan:

wow there is so much anime i haven’t finished yet

let’s start another

Source: yoshimura-san

25th August 2014

Photo reblogged from GIFs GIFs GIFs GIFs GIFs with 19,796 notes

Source: dr-fluffys-symposium

25th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from It Dwells in Me with 893 notes

ufansius:

Tangled Up in You - Beth Cavener Stichter and Alessandro Gallo

Source: ufansius

25th August 2014

Post reblogged from It Dwells in Me with 77,959 notes

foulmouthedliberty:

sodomymcscurvylegs:

Being an adult is realizing that $5,000 is a lot of money to owe and very little money to own.

this is real

Source: sodomymcscurvylegs

23rd August 2014

Photo reblogged from SoSanguineRN with 150 notes

bpod-mrc:

23 August 2014
Lab-grown Brain
This might look like fancy confectionary, but it’s actually the spongy scaffold in which a sophisticated type of lab-grown brain tissue was created. The sponge-like material, which is made from a protein found in silk, was formed into six differently coloured rings and seeded with neurons from a rat, while the middle was filled with collagen gel – much like a jam doughnut. Within days, the neurons had formed networks and projected nerve fibres through the gel to connect with neurons across the doughnut. After a few weeks, the centre had become a distinct region of white matter, packed with crisscrossing nerve fibres, while the rings resembled neuron-packed grey matter. When researchers dropped a weight onto the tissue, it responded with changes in electrical and chemical activity much like a real rat brain. Among other things, then, this brain-like tissue could be used to study how brains respond to traumatic injury.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by David Kaplan and colleaguesTufts University, USAOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in PNAS, August 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

23 August 2014

Lab-grown Brain

This might look like fancy confectionary, but it’s actually the spongy scaffold in which a sophisticated type of lab-grown brain tissue was created. The sponge-like material, which is made from a protein found in silk, was formed into six differently coloured rings and seeded with neurons from a rat, while the middle was filled with collagen gel – much like a jam doughnut. Within days, the neurons had formed networks and projected nerve fibres through the gel to connect with neurons across the doughnut. After a few weeks, the centre had become a distinct region of white matter, packed with crisscrossing nerve fibres, while the rings resembled neuron-packed grey matter. When researchers dropped a weight onto the tissue, it responded with changes in electrical and chemical activity much like a real rat brain. Among other things, then, this brain-like tissue could be used to study how brains respond to traumatic injury.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by David Kaplan and colleagues
Tufts University, USA
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in PNAS, August 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

Source: bpod-mrc

23rd August 2014

Photo reblogged from hire me for babysitting with 462,151 notes

noonewilleverfindmehere:

NO NO NO YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS IS A REALLY FAMOUS ANIMATION FILM TECHNIQUE DONE BY ONE INSANE STUDIO YEARS AND YEARS AGO IN GERMANY, ONLY A FEW FILMS, BECAUSE OF HOW HARD THEY WERE TO MAKE.
EACH AND EVERY FRAME OF THESE MOVIES ARE OIL PAINTINGS ON GLASS.

noonewilleverfindmehere:

NO NO NO YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND THIS IS A REALLY FAMOUS ANIMATION FILM TECHNIQUE DONE BY ONE INSANE STUDIO YEARS AND YEARS AGO IN GERMANY, ONLY A FEW FILMS, BECAUSE OF HOW HARD THEY WERE TO MAKE.

EACH AND EVERY FRAME OF THESE MOVIES ARE OIL PAINTINGS ON GLASS.

Source: pr0fundum

23rd August 2014

Photoset reblogged from hire me for babysitting with 3,287 notes

artruby:

Anya Gallaccio

Tagged: like velvet o. o

Source: artruby

23rd August 2014

Photo reblogged from You're Cute with 18,330 notes

Source: shoujoromance